“Shakespeare Moment #2″

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Company Theater from Mumbai, India

Twelfth Night

“Twins being lost is very famous to Indian culture.”


“Shakespeare Moment #1″ – Maori – “Troilus and Cressida”

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9 minute demo – “Shakespeare and Social Justice”

This 9 minute radio demo was prepared for a recent grant application. This excerpt presents our conception of Shakespeare as works that are for everyone – for all of us. The works themselves and the wonderful people who present them, stimulate discussions about race, class, gender, equality, power, love and many other important issues. Please let us know your reaction.


Anthony Heald as Shylock

Anthony Heald as Shylock

This year’s production of “Merchant of Venice” at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, directed by Bill Rauch and starring Anthony Heald as Shylock was a magnificent indictment on the cost of prejudice. Set both in contemporary and Elizabethan times, it rang true to today’s issues while still balancing the comedy and the tragic elements of this fine Shakespeare play.

Although it’s too late to see the play, you can still listen in as Heald deconstructs his speech as the famed character Shylock. He provides a rare window into the actor’s process.

Dmae Roberts produced this piece with music is by veteran OSF composer Todd Barton.

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Ako in “Throne of Blood”

Back in the 1950s, Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa adapted the story of Macbeth into a film called “Throne of Blood.” This year, noted theatre director Ping Chong adapted “Throne of Blood” into a multimedia play for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

In this On Demand special, Dmae Roberts asked Ako about how she plays Lady Asaji, the role based on Lady Macbeth.

In this interview, Ako tells us how she handles this role with very few scenes and artful movement.

Music is by veteran OSF composer Todd Barton.

Ako

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Ping Chong’s “Throne of Blood” is currently in performance at Brooklyn Academy of Music.


Moya O’Connell

Moya O'Connell

Moya O’Connell is an actor who has previously performed at the Bard on the Beach Shakespeare Festival in Vancouver, British Columbia. In this audio excerpt, she recites a speech from The Winter’s Tale.

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Barry Kraft

Barry Kraft and Kevin Lynch

Barry Kraft has acted and served as a dramaturg at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival as well as at other theatres across the country. In this audio excerpt, Barry Kraft and Kevin Lynch read from Julius Caesar.

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Charles Wu

Charles Wu

Charles Q. Wu is Professor Emeritus of Chinese and Humanities at Reed College, where he taught from 1988-2002. Dr. Wu was born in raised in Shanghai, China, and studied and taught at Beijing Foreign Languages Institute.  He left China in 1980 to pursue a Ph.D. at Columbia University in English literature with a specialty in romantic English poetry.  His dissertation explored a Taoist reading of William Wordsworth.

As an intellectual in Maoist China, Charles Wu was placed under solitary confinement. While there, Professor Wu wondered to himself, “Maybe it was people like us [Mao] had in mind to clean up all that was considered old and reactionary.” Those thoughts led Professor Wu to think of Shakespeare’s   Sonnet 29, which he transcribed in English in his diary. Here, Professor Wu reads Sonnet 29.

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Susan Patella

A student of Susan Patella's

Susan Patella is a 6th grade English teacher at University Prep in Seattle where puts on a Shakespeare play each year with her students through a program called “Shake Hands with Shakespeare.”

In this audio excerpt she discusses how she talks about metaphors with her students. Metaphors do for language, she says, what espresso does for coffee.

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You can also go behind the scenes of the students’ rehearsals. In this clip, the witches from Macbeth rehearse.

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This clip features Romeo and Juliet rehearsing the famous balcony scene.

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Dominic Dromgoole

Dominic Dromgoole /Photo: Sheila Burnet

Dominic Dromgoole is the Artistic Director of the Globe Theatre in London. Born into a theatrical family, he studied English at Cambridge University, began work as a part-time assistant director at London’s Bush Theatre, and rose to become artistic director there (1990–7). He directed new plays for Peter Hall’s company at the Old Vic and then took over at the Oxford Stage Company (1998–2005). In 2006 he succeeded Mark Rylance as artistic director of Shakespeare’s Globe. His publications include The Full Room: An A-Z of Contemporary Playwriting (2001), and a memoir, Will and Me: How Shakespeare Took Over My Life (2006).

Read more: Dominic Dromgoolehttp://encyclopedia.stateuniversity.com/pages/6027/Dominic-Dromgoole.html#ixzz0sTqhdFJC

Shakespeare is known for his incredible writing, but sometimes one may come across some really awful patches. Dromgoole explains why those bad patches of writing are there, and how Shakespeare was able to move past them.

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Paul Edmondson

Paul Edmondson

Paul Edmondson is Head of Learning at The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, an Honorary Fellow of The Shakespeare Institute, and an Honorary Fellow of The Society for Teachers of Speech and Drama. His first degree is from the University of Durham. He did his post-graduate work at The Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham, and produced a critical edition of The London Prodigal (1605) for his Ph. D.

King Lear ends with the title character grieving for his daughter. In this audio excerpt, Paul Edmondson explains how Shakespeare uses direct language to get an eternal question: Why do the innocent suffer?

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Christopher Gaze

Christopher Gaze is the Artistic Director of the Bard on the Beach Shakespeare Festival in Vancouver, British Columbia, which he founded in 1990. He has acted in his home country of England, as well as in Canada and the United States.

In this audio excerpt, Gaze talks about the power of Shakespeare to express the human condition.

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In this audio excerpt, Gaze recites the closing lines of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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Frank Guarrera

Frank Guarrera

Frank Guarrera (December 3, 1923 – November 23, 2007) was an Italian-American lyric baritone who enjoyed a long and distinguished career at the Metropolitan Opera, singing with the company for a total of 680 performances. He performed 35 different roles at the Met, mostly from the Italian and French repertories, from 1948 through 1976. In this audio excerpt, Guarrera takes us through an aria from Falstaff, an opera by Verdi based on The Merry Wives of Windsor.

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Libby Appel

Libby Appel

Libby Appel served as the of Artistic Director of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival from 1995-2007, where she also directed 27 productions. She has also worked at theatres across the United States.

When she was younger, Appel liked a stage filled with visual effects. Now, she prefers to have theatre stripped down to its essence: telling a story.

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Anthony Heald, Actor

Anthony Heald

Anthony Heald has been an actor at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival for six seasons. His roles include: Shag in Equivocation, Wolsey in Henry VIII, Patrick in The Further Adventures of Hedda Gabler, Stage Manager in Our Town, Iago in Othello,  Man in The Turn of the Screw.  He’s also appeared on Broadway in Inherit the Wind, Love! Valour! Compassion! (Tony Award nomination),  and Anything Goes! (Tony Award nomination). His film and TV credits include Boston PublicBoston LegalNavy NCISThe PracticeX-FilesFrasierRed Dragon8MM,Silence of the LambsA Time to KillThe ClientThe Pelican BriefPostcards from the Edge.

In the 2010 OSF season he performed Shylock in The Merchant of Venice directed by Bill Rauch.

In this audio interview, he deconstructs in “Hath not a Jew…” speech for us and then performs it fully. In this OSF production of “Merchant,” Shylock is attacked by two men before delivering the speech directly to the audience. Music Credit: Todd Barton, long-time resident composer at OSF.

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Frank X

Frank X

Frank X is a wonderful actor from Philadelphia who has appeared across the country in  a wide range of roles, many of them in Shakespeare.  We caught up with him late one night after a riveting performance at the Seattle Rep production of “Twelfth Night”.

Here he talks with Steve Rowland and reflects on the layers of meaning, across time, in being African American and playing the role of Malvolio, a servant, not originally written to be an African American.

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Click here to learn more about Frank X and read interview excerpts.


John Hopkins

John Hopkins

John Hopkins is an accomplished actor who has performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company as well as on the screen in the U.K and America.

In this clip at an RSC workshop, he was called in at the last minute to recite the speech to an audience.  This is an example of current acting styles, in which the lines are delivered in a natural way.

Surprisingly, this was Hopkins first time reciting the famous speech.

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Click here to learn more about John Hopkins and read interview excerpts.


James Shapiro

James Shapiro

Professor James Shapiro speaking to an audience at Columbia University shortly after the publication of his groundbreaking book:

“1599, One Year in the Life of Shakespeare“.  In this excert, Shapiro talks briefly about life in London in the late 1590s.  His newest book is “Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare?”

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Ursula Meyer

Ursula Meyer

Actress Ursula Meyer  has worked as an actor and  a voice coach at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival for numerous seasons. Here she deconstructs a beautiful passage from “As You Like It”.

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Click here to learn more about Ursula Meyer and read interview excerpts.


Adriano Shaplin

Adriano Shaplin

Recorded at a “Family Day” at the Royal Shakespeare Company.  New Yorker, playwright Adriano Shaplin, gives his group the 5 rules of playwriting.  Pay attention so you can put them to good use when you’re writing your own play.

Shaplin is a founding member of The Riot Group, a small ensemble of theatre artists creating new dramatic work for the stage.

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Click here to learn more about Adriano Shaplin and read interview excerpts.


Derrick Lee Weeden

Derrick Lee Weeden

In 18 seasons at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Weeden has portrayed these Shakespeare roles: Prospero in The Tempest, Cardinal Pandulph in King John,  Boyet in Love’s Labour’s Lost, Marcus Brutus in Julius Caesar, Aaron inTitus Andronicus, Othello in Othello, Duke in Measure for Measure, Edmond in King Lear, Coriolanus in Coriolanus, Bolingbroke in Richard II, Warwick inThe Conclusion of Henry VI, Pericles in Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Oberon in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, among others.

This veteran actor from the Oregon Shakespeare Festival talks about how great actors of the past including Richard Burton, John Gielguld and Laurence Olivier have used their voices.

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Click here to learn more about Derrick Lee Weeden and read interview excerpts.


Hip Hop Hamlet at 75th season of OSF

"Hamlet" Courtesy: Oregon Shakespeare Festival

One of the largest regional theatres in the country is located in a small college town. The Tony-award-winning Oregon Shakespeare Festival started off as outdoor summer theatre back in 1935. Now its budget hovers around $27 million dollars.And while nonprofit theatres struggle in hard times, OSF finished last season in the black. Dmae Roberts talked with Artistic Director Bill Rauch, Actor Anthony Heald, Exeuctive Director Paul Nicholson and several theatre-goers about what makes this theatre company a success.

Dmae Roberts produced this piece that features a modern “Hamlet” with a hip hop beat.

This 5 minute piece originally aired on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday.

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